• Baby bunnies are commonly referred to as kittens.
  • A rabbit’s teeth never stop growing (this is why rabbits love to chew).
  • Female rabbits are referred to as does.
  • Male rabbits are referred to as bucks.
  • The backbone of a rabbit is very fragile and can break easily when handled improperly or if a rabbit is dropped on its back.
  • Domestic rabbits are born without fur.
  • Rabbits are generally the most active during the evening and early morning.
  • When rabbits grind their teeth it can sound like a purr.
  • Rabbits are nearsighted.
  • Rabbits are classified as mammals.
  • Rabbits are not rodents but can resemble them in appearance.
  • The largest number of kittens every born in a litter is 24!
  • A rabbit has five toenails on its front two paws and four toenails on its back two feet,for a total of 18.
  • The longest rabbit ears ever recorded measured 79cm long.
  • The world’s heaviest rabbit is Darius at 22kg.
  • Hundreds of years ago, rabbits were often released on deserted islands in hopes of giving shipwrecked sailors a reliable food source.
  • There are over 150 recognised rabbit coat colours and varieties.
  • The current world record for a rabbit long jump is three metres.
  • The current world record for the rabbit high jump is one metre.
  • A rabbit will eat its own cecotropes (night droppings)- they are a valuable source of protein.
  • In ancient Egypt, rabbits were used as sport for dog racing.
  • Rabbits were an important home meat supply during World War II.
  • There are around 180 different rabbit breeds worldwide.
  • Rabbits can be litter trained.
  • A pet rabbit can live as long as 10 years.
  • Rabbits need hay to assist the digestive system and prevent fur balls in their stomach.
  • Rabbit droppings make an excellent garden fertiliser.
  • Rabbits can jump 90cm and higher.
  • When rabbits are happy, they will jump and twist. This is called a binky.
  • Predators can literally scare a rabbit to death.
  • Rabbit whiskers are as wide as the body (so they can feel their way in tunnels and not get stuck).
  • Rabbits’ noses twitch 20 to 120 times per minute (faster when excited or stressed and slower when relaxed or sleeping).
  • Rabbits can’t see directly in front of their nose but can see behind them (to keep an eye out for danger approaching).
  • Rabbits lick each other and humans as a sign of affection (the ‘top bunny’ will request grooming from subordinates).
  • Rabbits shed hair when you hold them and they are stressed (a defence mechanism, to wriggle free from a predator’s grip).
  • Rabbits can sleep with their eyes open (a useful trick but disconcerting for us).

Pet Care

  • We all love spending time outdoors on these long summer days, and our pets are no exception! The increased activity is great for their mental and physical health. To prevent some common warm-weather hazards from raining on your pet’s parade, follow these summer safety tips! Heat stressIn hot weather, cats and dogs can be at …
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  • Holidaying with your pet Is your pet joining you for a Christmas holiday trip? Here are some basic pet travel guidelines to keep everyone merry! Making a list and checking it twice Pets away from home can easily get disoriented and lost. Before you travel, check that your pet’s microchip registration details are up-to-date. If …
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  • We are very pleased to announce our sponsorship of Templestowe Valley Preschool’s aquarium. Staff at Templestowe Valley have found that the new classroom addition provides a calming distraction, stimulating young minds and encouraging new enquiries into science and animal care. The final weeks of the school term can be very demanding on preschool-age children as …
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