Part of the charm of owning a pet is getting to enjoy their unique personality and behavioural quirks.

However, it is not uncommon for animals to develop behavioural problems and when this happens, it can affect the quality of life for both pets and owners.

Common behavioural issues include:

  • Separation anxiety
  • Reactivity to other dogs or people
  • Aggression
  • Storm phobia
  • Hyperactivity
  • Anxiety about being handled or visiting the vet

History, causes and treatment

There are a wide range of factors which can play a role in the development of behavioural problems in pets. Their history, lifestyle and home environment can all influence the way your pet behaves or reacts in a particular situation. Identifying the cause of a behavioural problem can be done through an extended consultation with a veterinarian.

Behavioural management and modification techniques tend to be the most common and effective tools in treating behavioural issues, but it all depends on the unique needs of the animal. In some cases, your veterinarian may also prescribe medication to manage a problem. Vets on Parker also works closely with a number of qualified dog training professionals who can work with us to develop effective treatment plants.

Pet Care

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